The Afroqueerized Beekeeper

latinosexuality:

whenthespiritscall:

On Saturday, Oct, 12, Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, Director and Producer of When the Spirits Call, will be sitting next to these wonderful women of color for a conversation that will offer an original perspective and point of view about what does it mean to be a female documentarian of color. Panel will take place at LIU Brooklyn Campus. ADMISSION: $7/ Tickets in advance:https://definingmyselfreelsisters.eventbrite.com/

who is meeting me there?
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latinosexuality:

whenthespiritscall:

On Saturday, Oct, 12, Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, Director and Producer of When the Spirits Call, will be sitting next to these wonderful women of color for a conversation that will offer an original perspective and point of view about what does it mean to be a female documentarian of color. Panel will take place at LIU Brooklyn Campus. ADMISSION: $7/ Tickets in advance:https://definingmyselfreelsisters.eventbrite.com/

who is meeting me there?


Radical History Review: Water

dukeupress:

image

"Indeed, climate scientists tell us that dramatic shifts in weather, either too hot or too cold, too wet or too dry, will become commonplace, creating conditions where the struggles over and control of water will emerge as one of the central political, ecological, and public health issues of the twenty-first century." - Excerpt by David Kinkela, Teresa Meade, and Enrique Ochoa, editors, from "Water," in Radical History Review 116, Spring 2013


We cannot blame the US beekeepers for turning to chemical control methods to keep their colonies alive. Their option was to let their colonies die and not fulfill pollination contracts. If honey bee populations were allowed to crash from the mites, what would happen to the 615,000 acres (~250,000 hectares) of almond trees in California that require bee pollination all at once? Or 1,000 acres (~400 hectares) of blueber- ries in Maine? Or, 100 acres (~40 hectares) of apples in Washington, or even 50 acres (~20 hectares) of pumpkins in Minnesota? The simple fact is that the American public would not have tolerated a reduced crop of bee-pollinated fruits and vegetables for the ten to twenty years it would have taken for the honey bee population to naturally evolve defenses against the mites and build up to pre-mite population levels. It was in the immediate interests of most people to keep our fruits and vegetables pollinated by honey bees so we could continue to purchase inexpensive, well-formed, and succulent produce.

— from managing alternative pollinators (via farmerinthedelll)

(Source: gotthatglitteronmyeyes)